Video 10 Apr 95 notes

lettersfromtaiwan:

Collection of photos of the end to the Sunflower Student Movement occupation of the Legislative Yuan on April 10th, from Taipei Times.

TOP: Student protesters and members of the public last night hold up their lit mobile phones on Jinan Road in Taipei, where they gathered after students evacuated the Legislative Yuan. Apr 11, 2014 Photo: Fang Pin-chao, Taipei Times
BOTTOM LEFT: Police take control of the Legislative Yuan in Taipei after students evacuated the premises yesterday. Apr 11, 2014  Photo: Lo Pei-der, Taipei Times
BOTTOM RIGHT: Students hold sunflowers as they leave the Legislative Yuan yesterday and enter Jinan Road in Taipei. Apr 11, 2014 Photo: George Tsorng, Taipei Times
Photo 8 Apr 16,000 notes dytabytes:

alejandrablaze:

ani-bester:

gehayi:

liamdryden:

stabra:

absolutezeronow:

fascinasians:

danapolis:

stabra:

after hearing about it through the submission to @angryasiangirlsunited, i checked out the trailer of Lucy and am even more disgusted. and so not surprised. whiteness is getting too old.


the upcoming movie lucy will feature the age-old racist narrative of pure white woman (scarlet johansson) being violated by scary, brown men. and the new white feminist trope of women gaining their power by violently eliminating brown men. who needs the white male savior when we now have white female saviors, taking it into their own hands to save their whiteness from all that non-whiteness. so radical.



My favorite part are the white feminists who are raving about this movie because “strong independent woman yaaaas!!”

Sigh.

i’m just wondering why there are herbs and fruits and vegetables written in a faded, creepy red on a prison-like wall in chinese.  are herbs and fruits and vegetables in chinese supposed to be part of some sort of scare tactics?  or am i missing something here?

it keeps getting better.

awww man see I immediately fell into the trap of being excited for all the kickass lady stuff and didn’t give this much thought
This is a very valid point and hugely disappointing

I just found the summary of this thing: 
"The story focuses on a woman (Scarlett Johansson) who is forced to become a drug mule. But when the drug accidentally goes into her body, she is mysteriously granted superhuman powers. She absorbs knowledge instantly, can move objects with her mind and can’t feel any pain or distress–plus look hot as hell doing it."
Isn’t insensitivity to pain considered a disability? And isn’t it a serious problem for those who have that genetic condition?
Also, you’re going to love WHY she gets the superpowers. To quote The Journalist: “The pretext for this is that the drug allows her access to 28% of her brain’s capacity, as the human mind only allows access to 10%. Teaming up with a professor, played by Morgan Freeman, she examines her own abilities and looks to see what happens when 100% of her mind’s capacity is unlocked.”
The “only 10% of the brain is used” concept is a complete myth. All of the brain is used—it’s just that it isn’t used simultaneously. Also, much of the brain exists to keep the body operational. It’s not just for thinking.
So far we’ve got racism, faux feminism, scare tactics, trying to pass off a disability as a superpower, and incredibly bad science even by Hollywood standards. Great.

Valid poinrs

those are fruits and vegetable names written in blood-like paint behind her… are they code words? do they mean something? or do they just look like convenient oriental gibberish to serve as props?

I’m thinking probably just gibberish. Someone needed convenient handwritten words, so they went to Chinatown and took pictures of the fruit stands because they were the first ones they could find.


such flattering Taiwanese representation.   Isn’t this basically the plot of Wolverine.

dytabytes:

alejandrablaze:

ani-bester:

gehayi:

liamdryden:

stabra:

absolutezeronow:

fascinasians:

danapolis:

stabra:

after hearing about it through the submission to @angryasiangirlsunited, i checked out the trailer of Lucy and am even more disgusted. and so not surprised. whiteness is getting too old.

the upcoming movie lucy will feature the age-old racist narrative of pure white woman (scarlet johansson) being violated by scary, brown men. and the new white feminist trope of women gaining their power by violently eliminating brown men. who needs the white male savior when we now have white female saviors, taking it into their own hands to save their whiteness from all that non-whiteness. so radical.

My favorite part are the white feminists who are raving about this movie because “strong independent woman yaaaas!!”

Sigh.

i’m just wondering why there are herbs and fruits and vegetables written in a faded, creepy red on a prison-like wall in chinese.  are herbs and fruits and vegetables in chinese supposed to be part of some sort of scare tactics?  or am i missing something here?

it keeps getting better.

awww man see I immediately fell into the trap of being excited for all the kickass lady stuff and didn’t give this much thought

This is a very valid point and hugely disappointing

I just found the summary of this thing

"The story focuses on a woman (Scarlett Johansson) who is forced to become a drug mule. But when the drug accidentally goes into her body, she is mysteriously granted superhuman powers. She absorbs knowledge instantly, can move objects with her mind and can’t feel any pain or distress–plus look hot as hell doing it."

Isn’t insensitivity to pain considered a disability? And isn’t it a serious problem for those who have that genetic condition?

Also, you’re going to love WHY she gets the superpowers. To quote The Journalist: “The pretext for this is that the drug allows her access to 28% of her brain’s capacity, as the human mind only allows access to 10%. Teaming up with a professor, played by Morgan Freeman, she examines her own abilities and looks to see what happens when 100% of her mind’s capacity is unlocked.”

The “only 10% of the brain is used” concept is a complete myth. All of the brain is used—it’s just that it isn’t used simultaneously. Also, much of the brain exists to keep the body operational. It’s not just for thinking.

So far we’ve got racism, faux feminism, scare tactics, trying to pass off a disability as a superpower, and incredibly bad science even by Hollywood standards. Great.

Valid poinrs

those are fruits and vegetable names written in blood-like paint behind her… are they code words? do they mean something? or do they just look like convenient oriental gibberish to serve as props?

I’m thinking probably just gibberish. Someone needed convenient handwritten words, so they went to Chinatown and took pictures of the fruit stands because they were the first ones they could find.

such flattering Taiwanese representation. Isn’t this basically the plot of Wolverine.

Video 3 Apr 826 notes

THE MAGIC BEGINS - Day 15: Dreamcast for your favourite character(s) [2/?].
R I Z  A H M E D as Newt Scamander

(Source: wizard-weekly)

Video 31 Mar 49 notes

lettersfromtaiwan:

Fly over of the crowds of protestors gathered in Taipei for the 3-30 Rally.

發佈時間:2014年03月30日

OPticFlight 衛星定位多旋翼空中拍攝載具

Link 26 Mar 129 notes How you can help #Taiwan if you live in the United States»

From American Citizens for Taiwan (http://americancitizensfortaiwan.org/action/)

The U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs will meet tomorrow (March  25, 2014) to markup H. Res. 494 “Affirming the importance of the Taiwan Relations Act.” If you live in the U.S. please go to the ACT site now and tell your member of Congress to support this important bill, it only takes 3 minutes.


While you are there, you can also take action on the other Taiwan related bills. These bills are what we push in the U.S. to help protect Taiwan’s democracy.


http://ACTtaiwan.org/issues

(I run http://westandfortaiwan.tumblr.com)

Video 26 Mar 168 notes
Photo 26 Mar 241 notes shihlun:

Taiwanese students protesting against a China Taiwan trade pact are sprayed with water cannons while occupying the government Cabinet offices in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, March 24, 2014.
photo by 杭大鵬

shihlun:

Taiwanese students protesting against a China Taiwan trade pact are sprayed with water cannons while occupying the government Cabinet offices in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, March 24, 2014.

photo by 杭大鵬

Link 24 Mar 31 notes Our democracy must not die»
Video 24 Mar 36 notes

infinitizers:

[What is happening in Taiwan] The youth trying to preserve democracy.

cr : Penny Lin

Well, basically it’s not really my things, since I’m not Taiwanese. I don’t even know the real problem of them, but still, since because I live in Taiwan right now. I have to share this as my concern.

Watch it, and you can understand. The time is not too long anymore, so let’s support them as human, and young generation.

Link 23 Mar 55 notes Reuters covers the #Taiwanprotests but misses the mark on #Taiwanesehistory»

westandwithtaiwan:

From the comments section:

Many thanks to Reuters for covering the unfolding protests in Taiwan. However, the reporter’s brief summary of Taiwan’s history vis-a-vis China is highly misleading: ‘Taiwan and China have been ruled separately since the Communists took power on the mainland in 1949, though relations have warmed considerably since the China-friendly Ma won the presidency in 2008 and secured re-election in 2012.’

In fact, Taiwan and China have been ruled separately for most of the last four hundred years. Prior to that Taiwan was a free island without dynastic or state governance. Parts of it were colonized by the Dutch and Spanish in the 17th century, and even the French had a toehold in the 19th. Supporters of the Ming and Qing dynasties also fought each other, the aboriginal inhabitants, and Europeans for control over portions of the island. For more than fifty years, from the end of the nineteenth century to the end of World War II, Taiwan was a Japanese colony.

The idea that the post-1949 era is an aberration (with Taiwan ‘breaking away’ from an inviolate, unchanging entity known as ‘China’), instead of another period of continued evolution in the island’s status, is to buy into a myth, one that is in the current Chinese government’s interest to promote.

Link 23 Mar 55 notes Reuters covers the #Taiwanprotests but misses the mark on #Taiwanesehistory»

westandwithtaiwan:

From the comments section:

Many thanks to Reuters for covering the unfolding protests in Taiwan. However, the reporter’s brief summary of Taiwan’s history vis-a-vis China is highly misleading: ‘Taiwan and China have been ruled separately since the Communists took power on the mainland in 1949, though relations have warmed considerably since the China-friendly Ma won the presidency in 2008 and secured re-election in 2012.’

In fact, Taiwan and China have been ruled separately for most of the last four hundred years. Prior to that Taiwan was a free island without dynastic or state governance. Parts of it were colonized by the Dutch and Spanish in the 17th century, and even the French had a toehold in the 19th. Supporters of the Ming and Qing dynasties also fought each other, the aboriginal inhabitants, and Europeans for control over portions of the island. For more than fifty years, from the end of the nineteenth century to the end of World War II, Taiwan was a Japanese colony.

The idea that the post-1949 era is an aberration (with Taiwan ‘breaking away’ from an inviolate, unchanging entity known as ‘China’), instead of another period of continued evolution in the island’s status, is to buy into a myth, one that is in the current Chinese government’s interest to promote.

Link 23 Mar 18 notes 'As Numbers Swell, Students Pledge to Continue Occupying Taiwan's Legislature'»

westandwithtaiwan:

From the comments section:

Many thanks to Austin Ramzy and the New York Times for this balanced, informative piece. Thank you especially for noting that Taiwan is self-governed. The People’s Republic of China has never exercised rule over the island. The term ‘reunification’ is inaccurate and hides a political agenda that the mainstream media too often buys into. We ought to be speaking of attempted annexation instead.

I am a second-generation Taiwanese American. My parents grew up under martial law, without the right to speak, write, or assemble freely. Taiwan has undergone a sea change in the thirty years since their emigration; it is now a modern, prosperous democracy, a leader in gay rights, religious freedom, and gender equality in the Asian world. But its security and sovereignty are under constant threat both from the PRC and the ruling Kuomingtang (KMT - Chinese Nationalist) party, which has always sought to promote Chinese interests and identity above that of Taiwan. But the younger generation, whatever their family background (aboriginal, ‘native Taiwanese’, or post-1949 arrivals) have never known any home except for Taiwan. They have grown up along with its nascent democracy, and they are awakening to fight for it. 

 

Photo 22 Mar 54 notes lettersfromtaiwan:

Via Taiwan Voice
Caption: If it is so bitter why do you drink it?

lettersfromtaiwan:

Via Taiwan Voice

Caption: If it is so bitter why do you drink it?

Photo 22 Mar 14 notes mochi-mosh:

What is this sorcery OMG so good I cry

mochi-mosh:

What is this sorcery OMG so good I cry

Link 21 Mar 22 notes China, We Fear You»

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